New LGPS Pools Put Spotlight on Data Management Practices

Amit Bharakda, Sales Director EMEA


Local government pension schemes in England and Wales are undergoing their most radical shake up in years. Currently, the LGPS is organised into 89 pension funds; under the new model, these funds will be combined into eight large investment pools that will manage pools of assets up to £40Bn. One of the central aims of the reform is to reduce investment costs and offer ‘excellent value for money’ by achieving greater economies of scale and introducing improved governance and decision making frameworks.

Creating the operational structures required to establish a common framework and consolidate the assets of multiple separate entities is no mean feat. As Stephen Doyle, BNY Mellon’s head of UK institutional relationship development for asset servicing, identified in his recent article for the Local Government Chronicle, one of the primary considerations is the ability for the authorised entity to receive a consolidated view of the assets within the pool and to deliver consolidated reporting. Having the right data management practices and platforms in place is vital to being able to achieve this and ultimately deliver on the UK government’s goals to improve efficiency and decision making.

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Introducing Eagle’s Latest Research: The Age of Agile Solutions

Jeremy Skaling, Global Head of Marketing


The investment landscape is evolving at a rapid pace. Firms that do not — or cannot — respond to shifting client, market and regulatory demands risk missing out on business opportunities or, worse, losing ground against their competitors. Keeping pace in this fast-moving, high-stakes environment requires agile solutions and the technology to enable them.

In conjunction with WatersTechnology, Eagle recently published a new white paper based on a survey of senior-level professionals from global banks, asset managers, hedge funds and insurance companies. The goal of the research was to uncover the extent to which these organizations are able to utilize technology to adapt to new business needs and whether they are embracing an agile technology framework that enables them to react rapidly and with confidence.

The findings reveal that while the vast majority (94%) recognize the importance of being able to deliver solutions quickly to meet new business needs, only 7% feel their organizations are well prepared to do so. Investing in robust data management frameworks, embracing new delivery models through the cloud, and rethinking operational workflows to incorporate managed services and outsourcing, all emerged as key components of a more comprehensive strategy. These are essential to create an interconnected ecosystems that can better respond to new opportunities and demands. Read More…

The Business Challenges that are Shaping Innovation in Data Management

Colin Pope, Lead Solution Architect EMEA and APAC


In recent commentary, my colleague Marc Rubenfeld explored the evolutionary path of some of the key innovations in data management over the last 30 years. One of the main takeaways was that investment managers are becoming quicker to embrace new technological developments as they look to achieve greater efficiency and focus on core competencies. The data management challenges themselves—ensuring data quality, consistency, availability and accessibility—have remained broadly the same as they always have been. However, it is the newer business challenges that are really driving innovation and shaping technological advances in the world of data management.

I expanded on the topic of innovation in data management at a recent London event, where Eagle hosted several consulting organisations. As part of my presentation, I identified specific business drivers that are influencing organisations and how some firms are reimagining data management strategies to leverage new technologies that may be better suited to address the challenges of today. Business drivers include:

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Meet…Chris Stirrat

Eagle Investment Systems’ Head of Cloud Engineering is overseeing 
Eagle’s ongoing transition to cloud-native architecture. 
Here, he shares both his philosophy around the cloud as well as how he envisions serving both existing users and new clients amid the transformation.

Q:   You recently joined Eagle after roughly two decades at Microsoft and Microsoft-affiliated companies to now lead the engineering team in spearheading the development of Eagle’s cloud-native architecture. Can you talk a little bit about your philosophy around the cloud?

A: The cloud should be viewed as an enabler for products and technology rather than a product unto itself. It’s really about how solutions are delivered and how the cloud allows users to consume software differently than they have in the past. With cloud delivery, users can access applications more quickly; the software is updated far more often, as enhancements are developed; and through continual iteration, the cloud also accelerates innovation.

So with this in mind, I really view my role as helping to improve the customer experience through making our solutions easier to use as well as seamless to consume and adopt. It also fits in well with what our parent BNY Mellon is doing around NEXENSM, their next-generation technology platform, and BXP, which is BNY Mellon’s secure, private cloud. Read More…

Macro Platforms, Micro Experiences

As we progress on Eagle’s deployment-model transformation, certain key principles will continue to guide our cloud-native journey.

Steve Taylor, Chief Technology Officer


The consumerization of IT has arrived and is having a deep and dramatic effect on our everyday lives. In fact, whether we realize it or not, digitalization has seeped into our subconscious to the point that it has altered digital interactions as well as assumptions of what is expected.

We expect a seamless client experience, which translates primarily into “always on” and a confidence that platforms will learn and evolve over time. Personalization around applications based on users’ behaviors is perhaps more commonplace than people realize. At home or in the office, the technology and digital platforms we use are focused on personalizing the experience and improving efficiency to get the task done faster.

Whether we realize it or not, it is our micro experiences that are critical to the success of the platform. This personalization drives the value of the technology we use—it may be the ease of finding a movie on Netflix that suits our individualized preferences or the ability to settle a credit card with a simple swipe or tap.

The challenge, however, is that old architectures cannot be wrapped or encapsulated to deliver these strategies. Legacy platforms were built to support a different set of use cases and “cloud wrapping” (encapsulating old capabilities into new paradigms) will not deliver the desired business outcome. These dated systems are often based on batch processes, with no clear separation of concerns and have a historic focus on a small set of super users as opposed to information consumers and citizen developers.

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Leveraging Data to Streamline and Optimize Implementations

The discussion at a recent TSAM NY panel underscored the role of data governance in systems implementation

Rich Vivolo, Lead Consultant


You can’t manage that which you can’t measureit is a business maxim that has only become more true as data has become increasingly available to track and benchmark business processes. While there has been a concerted effort throughout financial services to leverage operational metrics available through next-generation data management platforms, we are also finding that this intensifying deference to data can be just as useful in guiding new system implementations, themselves. This was a topic that we discussed as part of a panel at TSAM New York in June.

The principal dilemma for many organizations is whether a data governance program should be in place before an implementation occurs or if it should come afterward. While the answer often depends on whether an existing governance framework is already in place, the most successful implementations do indeed start with a defined process that at some point—either before or during an implementation—can incorporate metrics to both educate and motivate key stakeholders.

The importance of measuring and tracking progress during implementations was something that I stressed during the TSAM panel: Establishing a Firm-Wide Data-Quality Management Strategy. The panel was moderated by Accenture’s Mick Cartwright. Each of the panelists, including representatives from a global investment bank and an investment management firm, spoke to the challenges of creating a data governance model—often characterized as a chicken-or-egg predicament. The benefit of prioritizing data quality and governance at the earlier stages of an implementation is that the data can then inform everything that comes afterward.
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Meet…Daniel Joseph

Eagle’s Sales Director, Australia and New Zealand, discusses Eagle’s growing presence in the region and some of the key trends in the Australian market.

Q: You joined Eagle in October 2016—could you give us a bit of your background prior to joining and outline what you’ve been focusing on since you started?

A: I’ve worked in the financial services industry for the last 10 years in a number of organisations, including J.P. Morgan and ASX, the Australian Securities Exchange. I also worked for an investment manager before going into the technology solutions side of things at Omgeo immediately before joining Eagle. Having seen the financial services industry from a number of different angles has been invaluable to my role at Eagle. It’s helped me to empathise with our clients and understand the issues they’re contending with.

While the Sydney office opened in 2015, Eagle has had clients in Australia for well over 10 years. That in mind, my focus is on developing and leveraging our existing client relationships to help grow our presence. Part of our approach is to educate the market about Eagle, showing them that we are local in addition to the basics of who we are and what we do. The bigger picture though is to be highly consultative in nature and help buy-side firms think through all the different solutions—technology, managed services, and otherwise—that can help them compete and succeed in today’s marketplace.

For me, personally, my style is to engage, which complements our overall approach. I want to explore the challenges and issues facing the organizations that we talk to and then use the entire Eagle story to highlight where we can help solve those challenges. Also, being able to bring BNY Mellon and its four decades of business in Australia into the story extends our credibility, while also helping expand our solution set to meet more needs as our clients’ businesses evolve. Read More…

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