Posts by: Lindsey Allard

ENGAGE18: The Engagement Only Continues

With ENGAGE18 complete, Eagle’s Head of Americas and Chief Client Officer Diane McLoughlin shares the highlights from this year’s client conference

Diane McLoughlin, Head of Americas and Chief Client Officer


Many of our competitors define themselves as a “single solution.” This used to be a point of pride or at least a pithy marketing pitch. In practice, though, it has become clear today that no one single vendor is going to solve all of the challenges facing our industry.

According to research conducted by WatersTechnology and highlighted in the white paper, “The Age of Agile Solutions”, more than 40% of asset managers use ten or more systems, and the majority require at least seven systems to support their front-, middle- and back-offices. Given the pace of change and specialized capabilities required in today’s dynamic landscape, the thought of a closed, monolithic system probably conjures integration headaches.

In contrast to a single-vendor approach, ENGAGE18 represented a celebration of Eagle’s collaborative, client-driven approach. On full display was Eagle’s next-generation open platform as well as our expansive—and rapidly growing—ecosystem of vendor alliances. During our second day keynote presentation, we even announced a new collaboration with Microsoft to deliver a next-generation multi-tenant data management platform on the Azure public cloud. Our event attracted over 575 attendees, including nearly 400 client attendees, representing more than 100 unique organizations that traveled to Boca Raton from five different continents.

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ENGAGE18 Q&A: Becoming a Data Visionary through Eagle Managed ServicesSM

Eagle’s Liz Blake, who will be speaking at ENGAGE18, highlights why forward-thinking asset managers are abandoning an “incremental” approach to data management


Q: Most asset managers have been affected by significant shifts that have occurred across the industry landscape, including the rotation into passive strategies and its impact on fees, the growing regulatory burden, and, of course, the pace of technological change. How have you seen firms deal with these challenges as it relates to their approach to data management?

A: Firms typically pursue one of two possible paths. You have the data “incrementalists,” who are focused on the immediate challenge and are not necessarily looking at the whole picture. They tend to be far more focused on the production and maintenance of data rather than analyzing it. Ultimately, this speaks to the amount of value that the broader organization receives from the data management function. Most financial organizations, before now, have resisted more comprehensive transformations because the evolving backdrop has created a moving target. But given the insatiable demand for data today—driven by growth in the volume, varieties and velocity of data—many organizations are at a point where they need to transform their data management function or fall behind. Otherwise, they may struggle to accommodate AUM growth, launch new products, or even expand into new markets. Organizations today can no longer solve the data explosion by simply adding bodies or by sticking new technology onto old systems. Taking a reactive, piecemeal approach may solve each challenge as it arises and can help delay big decisions, but it comes at the expense of adding more technology debt, creating a more complex operating model, and introducing greater operational risk.

Then you have the true data visionaries, who are willing to step back and reconsider how their organization is positioned to meet new challenges. Those who fit into this category recognize the consequences of poor data quality. And they’re willing to reimagine a more revolutionary, data-inspired operating model that goes beyond simply meeting an immediate need to materially enhance the value of desired outcomes.

Q: That’s interesting. So how do you characterize those firms that would be considered a data visionary?

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