Performance Measurement: From Cost Center to Business Driver

At TSAM Boston, panelists highlighted how the ongoing evolution of the performance measurement function—enabled by technology—is creating a competitive advantage for those able to meet the growing data demands of investors.

Richard Flokos, Performance Product Owner


Recent research from Chestnut Advisory Group, published in November, emphasized the central role of performance reviews in helping asset managers secure lasting relationships with their clients. Even when performance suffers, the report concluded, informed investors are more likely to remain as long-term investors when the connection to broader market conditions is clear and communicated in advance.

This takeaway speaks to the organizational shift occurring within many investment firms, as performance measurement and risk teams are increasingly being viewed, not as a cost center, but rather as an elemental driver of the business at large. This was the very topic that we addressed during a recent panel discussion at TSAM Boston. The consensus among the assembled participants was that as performance teams begin to assume more prominent roles, their value is being recognized both internally, by other operating areas and the front office, and externally, by clients demanding more granularity and color around returns.

According to the Chestnut Advisory Group research, which featured a survey of nearly 90 asset owners and consultants, institutional investors today are particularly focused on performance data that can shed additional light on portfolio positioning, detailed attribution, and outcomes relative to strategy benchmarks. The timely delivery of performance data was also cited as a critical element of performance reviews by nearly three fourths of the investors polled. Less important, according to the survey, are the macro outlooks of fund managers or discussion around the best- or worst-performing positions.

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Can I Buy a Vowel? Why the Move from QA to QE is Necessary for Agile Development

While QA merely provides a quality check before deployment, QE is the process that instills quality into software design

Eric Getchell, Head of Quality and Infrastructure Services


A recent inquiry on the question-and-answer site Quora asked, “What is agile?” A seemingly simple question, yet it drew 40 responses, ranging from basic analogies to complex explanations complete with diagrams and related threads on the various types of agile frameworks. While Eagle has certainly touched on the many benefits of an agile development model, (here and here, for example), the transition from QA (Quality Assurance) to QE (Quality Engineering) can help contextualize what an agile model looks like in action and, more importantly, underscores how DevOps translates into improved quality and a faster time to value for clients.

Traditionally, developers have relied on quality assurance analysts to measure the quality of software ahead of deployment. In a customary waterfall operational model—in which products are designed, implemented and verified in sequential order—the quality assurance team is typically the last stop to eliminate any bugs in the code prior to release. Within this model, the role of a QA analyst is primarily to detect defects, measure the impact, and—when they invariably discover an issue—send the code back to the developers to begin the cycle anew.

Quality engineering, in contrast, is about defect prevention versus defect measurement. QE is effectively an upstream event in which quality engineers work alongside cross-functional development teams to discover and solve issues in real time. Enabled by an agile, iterative development model, the move to QE ensures quality is baked into the software at the onset of development and remains in focus not only up to but also beyond deployment. This process utilizes quality measurements at build time allowing for continuous quality gates prior to code submittal. Gone is the protracted feedback loop in which QA and the development team play hot potato with the code base until a fix occurs. In an agile model, quality is simply engineered into the entire process.

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How Eagle’s People Will be the Catalysts for Change

Eagle’s Global Head of Change Management and Organization Development discusses Eagle’s strategy to empower and engage frontline employees to drive transformation

Anna Domino, Global Head of Change Management and Organizational Development


There’s a saying in college football that programs are built in the offseason. This is particularly true when there is a change in strategy and coaches are tasked with matching existing players and recruits to new roles and schemes. Change management in financial services is no different. And in the era of digital disruption, it’s the people and their range of skill sets that will dictate whether organizations are successful effecting large-scale transformations.

McKinsey & Co., in February, highlighted the critical importance of frontline employees in driving business transformation. In a survey of more than 1,600 respondents whose organizations have completed change initiatives in the past five years, the consultant found a direct correlation between those companies whose frontline employees were visibly engaged in the effort and success in reaching the desired goals.

Eagle’s Chief Technology Officer Steve Taylor recently outlined the principles guiding Eagle’s deployment-model transformation. While it is clear the adoption of a cloud-native architecture and agile business model will bring new efficiencies and deliver material value to clients for years to come, what can be harder to recognize externally are all the different ways we’re engaging with our people to support and sustain the new operating model. As much as this effort will enhance Eagle’s go-to-market strategy, we expect it to be just as impactful in creating opportunities for both existing and future employees.

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New LGPS Pools Put Spotlight on Data Management Practices

Amit Bharakda, Sales Director EMEA


Local government pension schemes in England and Wales are undergoing their most radical shake up in years. Currently, the LGPS is organised into 89 pension funds; under the new model, these funds will be combined into eight large investment pools that will manage pools of assets up to £40Bn. One of the central aims of the reform is to reduce investment costs and offer ‘excellent value for money’ by achieving greater economies of scale and introducing improved governance and decision making frameworks.

Creating the operational structures required to establish a common framework and consolidate the assets of multiple separate entities is no mean feat. As Stephen Doyle, BNY Mellon’s head of UK institutional relationship development for asset servicing, identified in his recent article for the Local Government Chronicle, one of the primary considerations is the ability for the authorised entity to receive a consolidated view of the assets within the pool and to deliver consolidated reporting. Having the right data management practices and platforms in place is vital to being able to achieve this and ultimately deliver on the UK government’s goals to improve efficiency and decision making.

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Introducing Eagle’s Latest Research: The Age of Agile Solutions

Jeremy Skaling, Global Head of Marketing


The investment landscape is evolving at a rapid pace. Firms that do not — or cannot — respond to shifting client, market and regulatory demands risk missing out on business opportunities or, worse, losing ground against their competitors. Keeping pace in this fast-moving, high-stakes environment requires agile solutions and the technology to enable them.

In conjunction with WatersTechnology, Eagle recently published a new white paper based on a survey of senior-level professionals from global banks, asset managers, hedge funds and insurance companies. The goal of the research was to uncover the extent to which these organizations are able to utilize technology to adapt to new business needs and whether they are embracing an agile technology framework that enables them to react rapidly and with confidence.

The findings reveal that while the vast majority (94%) recognize the importance of being able to deliver solutions quickly to meet new business needs, only 7% feel their organizations are well prepared to do so. Investing in robust data management frameworks, embracing new delivery models through the cloud, and rethinking operational workflows to incorporate managed services and outsourcing, all emerged as key components of a more comprehensive strategy. These are essential to create an interconnected ecosystems that can better respond to new opportunities and demands. Read More…

The Business Challenges that are Shaping Innovation in Data Management

Colin Pope, Lead Solution Architect EMEA and APAC


In recent commentary, my colleague Marc Rubenfeld explored the evolutionary path of some of the key innovations in data management over the last 30 years. One of the main takeaways was that investment managers are becoming quicker to embrace new technological developments as they look to achieve greater efficiency and focus on core competencies. The data management challenges themselves—ensuring data quality, consistency, availability and accessibility—have remained broadly the same as they always have been. However, it is the newer business challenges that are really driving innovation and shaping technological advances in the world of data management.

I expanded on the topic of innovation in data management at a recent London event, where Eagle hosted several consulting organisations. As part of my presentation, I identified specific business drivers that are influencing organisations and how some firms are reimagining data management strategies to leverage new technologies that may be better suited to address the challenges of today. Business drivers include:

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Meet…Chris Stirrat

Eagle Investment Systems’ Head of Cloud Engineering is overseeing 
Eagle’s ongoing transition to cloud-native architecture. 
Here, he shares both his philosophy around the cloud as well as how he envisions serving both existing users and new clients amid the transformation.

Q:   You recently joined Eagle after roughly two decades at Microsoft and Microsoft-affiliated companies to now lead the engineering team in spearheading the development of Eagle’s cloud-native architecture. Can you talk a little bit about your philosophy around the cloud?

A: The cloud should be viewed as an enabler for products and technology rather than a product unto itself. It’s really about how solutions are delivered and how the cloud allows users to consume software differently than they have in the past. With cloud delivery, users can access applications more quickly; the software is updated far more often, as enhancements are developed; and through continual iteration, the cloud also accelerates innovation.

So with this in mind, I really view my role as helping to improve the customer experience through making our solutions easier to use as well as seamless to consume and adopt. It also fits in well with what our parent BNY Mellon is doing around NEXENSM, their next-generation technology platform, and BXP, which is BNY Mellon’s secure, private cloud. Read More…

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